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Walking School Bus

A Walking School Bus is a small, organized group of students who are accompanied by one or more adults on their walks to and from school. Typically, the students live near one another. Chances are, they already walk to school, with or without adult supervision.

The primary benefit of the Walking School Bus is that it provides a consistent, supervised system in which children can walk under the watchful eye of an adult, usually the parent or care giver of one of the students. Although this may be the primary benefit, there are many others.

Children who walk to school on a walking bus are part of a large and visible group which is supervised by adults and seen safely into school. This reassures parents who are concerned about letting their children walk on their own.

The walking bus helps children learn pedestrian skills so that when they begin to walk on their own they are better equipped to deal with traffic. It encourages additional students to walk, introducing them to an important and easy form of exercise.

It reduces auto traffic, particularly near schools during drop-off and pick-up times. Reducing auto traffic reduces air pollution and improves our local environment for everyone. It strengthens communities by getting people, parents and students in particular, to work together for a common good.

The journey to school gives children a chance to talk and make new friends, when they've arrived at school they've done their chatting and are more ready to learn. Over time, parents become the "eyes on the streets" of their neighborhood. They can help identify problem intersections along the route and monitor them so children can cross safely.

How to Start a Walking School Bus Program