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City of Clearwater to Host 60th Annual Fun 'n Sun Festival

4/24/2013 8:42:09 AM

Contact: Chrystal Ryals, 562-4811

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Apr. 24, 2013

Contact: Chrystal Ryals

(727) 562-4811

City of Clearwater to Host 60th Annual Fun ‘n Sun Festival

CLEARWATER, Fla. - Clearwater is celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Fun ‘n Sun Festival. This year’s ten-day festival will take place Friday, April 19 through Sunday, April 28.

A variety of events will take place during the festival including the Frenchy’s Sugar Sand Festival, Sun Toyota Fun ‘n Sun Celebration, and Clearwater’s Blast Friday . There are activities for residents and visitors to enjoy.

The line-up of events includes:

Frenchy’s Sugar Sand Festival

Friday, April 19- Sunday, April 28

Pier 60, Clearwater Beach

sugarsandfestival.com

(727) 449-1036

Children 12 & under free

Students (ages 13-18 with valid student ID) $5

Military & Seniors $5

Other Adults $7

Ten Sugar Sand Days & Sunset Nights

Celebrate Clearwater’s award-winning white, sugar sand beaches. A thousand tons of Clearwater’s world-renowned sand will be transformed into the Sugar Sand Walk Exhibit, an artistic walk-through of sand sculptures displayed in a 12,000 square-foot tent. The exhibit will be open from April 19-28 and accessible for a small admission fee. Frenchy’s Sugar Sand Festival will also offer a variety of free activities on Clearwater Beach for all ten sand-filled days including:

• Frenchy’s Master Sand Sculpting Competition features six master sculptors competing for a $5000 grand prize on the final weekend.

• Sugar Sand Sculpting Clinics allow visitors a chance to create their own sand masterpieces. Workshops will be held beachside both weekends and carving tools will be supplied.

• Speed Sand Demonstrations provide a fast-paced and interactive sand sculpting experience. Guests will be asked to write down unique and unusual ideas for sculptures that will be created on the spot. Suggestions will be chosen randomly; artists will have ten minutes to complete the challenge. Audience applause determines the winner of each round and the best out of three will be crowned champion!

• Camp Hyatt Sandbox is a children’s play area adjacent to the Sugar Sand Walk Exhibit providing all kinds of crazy and fun beach toys for the children in your group.

• “Sugar Sand Moments” will be popping up all over Clearwater Beach and the Clearwater area featuring an array of retail, beauty, food and beverage discounts. To find out more about all these enticing deals visit sugarsandfestival.com.

• Bright House Networks Sand Blast Fireworks will be part of the grand finale featuring a fantastic fireworks show above Pier 60 on April 27 at 9 p.m.

The ten-day festival will celebrate all that is spectacular about Clearwater Beach and prove why the readers of USA Today named Clearwater the Best Beach Town in Florida. In addition, the Fun ‘N Sun Festival will celebrate its 60th anniversary while the state of Florida celebrates their 500th birthday. As the sun is setting on a fabulous day spent at the Frenchy’s Sugar Sand Festival, the celebrations continue during the Sunsets at Pier 60 Daily Festival. This nightly gathering of local crafters, music and live entertainment kicks off as the big, orange sun melts into the tranquil waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

Bright House Networks presents Clearwater’s Blast Friday

Friday, April 26

5:30-10 p.m.

Downtown Clearwater, Cleveland Street

(727) 791-7400

blastfridayclearwater.com

BLAST Friday is a free monthly street festival on the last Friday of each month. On April 26, enjoy live music from Firefall, a variety of vendors, food, beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages. District retailers and restaurants are open during BLAST Fridays with outdoor dining available on Cleveland Street. The festival runs from 5:30 to 10 p.m. on the 400 Block of Cleveland Street at Osceola Avenue.

2013 Fun ‘n Sun Disc Golf Tournament

Friday, April 26: 1-8 p.m.

Saturday, April 27: 7 a.m.-8 p.m.

Sunday, April 28: 7 a.m.-8 p.m.

Cliff Stephens Park

(727) 504-9343

discgolfunited.com

Tampa Bay Disc Sports Club and the City of Clearwater present the 2013 Fun ‘n Sun Disc Golf Tournament. Lunch will be provided Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $25 - $70, depending on what division you qualify for, plus $10 for non-PDGA members. Preregistration is required. Same day registrations will not be accepted.

Sun Toyota Fun ‘n Sun Celebration presented by Q105

Saturday, April 27

Gates open 1 p.m.

Coachman Park, 301 Drew St.

Free General Admission

$25 Reserved Seating; $40 Weekend Reserved Seating

$75 VIP Hospitality; $125 Weekend VIP Hospitality (includes private bar, private air-conditioned restrooms, one dinner, two drinks, complimentary water and soda, shade with relaxed seating, and open seating on the right-side of the front of stage)

Prices do not include service charges.

Transamerica Stage:

1:30 p.m. Cloudburst

3 p.m. Shannon Magrane

4:35 p.m. Departure (Journey Tribute)

6:20 p.m. Air Supply

8:25 p.m. AMERICA

Schedule is subject to change.

Sun Toyota Fun ‘n Sun Celebration presented by WQYK

Sunday, April 28

Gates open 12 p.m.

Coachman Park, 301 Drew St.

Free General Admission

$25 Reserved Seating; $40 Weekend Reserved Seating

$75 VIP Hospitality; $125 Weekend VIP Hospitality (includes private bar, private air-conditioned restrooms, one dinner, two drinks, complimentary water and soda, shade with relaxed seating, and open seating on right-side of the front of stage)

Florida Central Credit Union Stage:

1:30 p.m. Joel Crouse

2:35 p.m. Rachel Farley

3:45 p.m. Chris Janson

5 p.m. Jon Pardi

6 p.m. Colt Ford

7:30 p.m. Billy Currington

The Archery Shop Acoustic Stage:

12:30 p.m. Greg West

2 p.m. Dakota Bradley

3:05 p.m. Katie Arminger

4:25 p.m. Drake White

Fun ‘n Sun Fireworks Finale

Schedule is subject to change.

AMERICA

The year 2010 marks the 40th anniversary of perennial classic-rock favorite, America. Founding members Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell (along with former band mate Dan Peek) met in high school in London in the late 1960s and quickly harmonized their way to the top of the charts on the strength of their signature song "A Horse with No Name.” America became a global household name and paved the way with an impressive string of hits following the success of their first #1 single. Forty years later, these friends are still making music together, touring the world and thrilling audiences with their timeless sound. America's journey has found them exploring a wide variety of musical terrain. Their best-known tunes, which also include "I Need You," "Ventura Highway," "Don't Cross The River," "Tin Man," "Lonely People," and "Sister Golden Hair" were cornerstones of 1970s Top 40 and FM rock radio. Beyond their impressive catalog of hits, listeners would discover there was always much more to America than surface perceptions. The combination of Gerry Beckley’s melodic pop rock and Dewey Bunnell’s use of folk-jazz elements, slinky Latin leaning rhythms and impressionistic lyric imagery contrasted well with Dan Peek's more traditional country-rock leanings and highly personal lyrics.

America's albums--six certified gold and/or platinum, with their first greatest hits collection, History, hitting more than $4 million in sales--displayed a fuller range of the trio's talents than did their singles. Their material encompassed an ambitious artistic swath; from effects-laden rockers to oddball medleys to soul-bearing ballads, America displayed a flawless blend of disparate genres and styles as wide-open as the great American plains. Enjoying massive success early in their career, America earned their stripes as musical soldiers on the battlefield amidst the excess, craziness and chaos of the 70s. The trio won the Grammy® for Best New Artist in 1972 and began working with George Martin and Geoff Emerick in 1974.

This successful team went on to record seven albums and several Top Ten hits, including “Tin Man” and “Sister Golden Hair.” By the mid-70s, inter-band conflicts combined with an exhaustive touring and recording schedule exacted its toll on the group. With Peek’s departure from the fold in 1977, his band mates rose to the challenge and carried on as a duo. Shifts in sound and direction, changes in producers and managers, and a renewed dedication to the craft of songwriting helped rocket America to the upper reaches of the pop charts in 1982 with their smash single, "You Can Do Magic." During this tumultuous time in their career, Beckley and Bunnell immersed themselves in their craft, infusing a newfound maturity into their rich body of work. Their growth as singers, songwriters and musicians has continued into the present day as illustrated by landmark releases such as

2000’s Highway three-disc box set, 2002’s Holiday Harmony, an album comprised of seasonal classics and live showcases, 2007's Here & Now and 2009’s Live In Concert: Wildwood Springs.

Since their formative years, America has been a band capable of transcending borders with its uplifting music and positive message. Embracing a rainbow of divergent cultures, America’s audiences continue to grow, comprising a loyal legion of first, second and third generation fans, all bearing testament to the group’s enduring appeal. "I think that the ingredients of the America sound are the basic fundamentals that translate internationally," explains Beckley. "The Italians are huge fans of dance music, but they also love a ballad-they're romantic at heart. It's the same in the Far East. A lot of times in these countries, we see people singing along, and they don't really know what the words mean. Music is truly the international language." In the midst of their 40th-year anniversary of music making, America continues to evolve while remaining a perennial mainstay on the domestic and international concert circuit and a cornerstone of 70s Top 40 and FM rock radio. In addition to their classics, America is revisiting their roots as writers and artists. The 40th anniversary show features songs reflecting some of their song-writing inspirations as well as showcasing their first album America with a very special acoustic set featuring standards such as "I Need You" and "Three Roses," as well as some never-before-performed deep cuts. From anonymous horses to fast-moving trains, America’s extraordinary four decade musical legacy of consummately crafted pop/rock songs, trademark lush harmonies and evocative lyrical landscapes will never go out of style.

Bios (courtesy of each Artist)

Air Supply Biography

Graham Russell & Russell Hitchcock met on May 12, 1975, the first day of rehearsals for "Jesus Christ Superstar" in Sydney, Australia; they became instant friends with their common love for The Beatles and, of course, singing. After the shows' performances at 10:30, they would play pizza parlors, coffee bars and night clubs with just one guitar and two voices. They quickly gained a reputation for great harmonies and for original songs that Graham was constantly writing. They made a demo on a cassette of two songs, "Love and Other Bruises" and "If You Knew Me" and took it to every record company in Sydney. Everyone turned it down but one — CBS Records — who admired their unique style.

They made a single in one afternoon and it shot to number one on the national charts. Air Supply was born! That same year, they opened for Rod Stewart across Australia and then throughout the U.S. and Canada playing all of the famous huge venues before Rod would take the stage. They found new fans, but did not break the U.S. market. Back in Australia they had to start again and made a record called Life Support. On this record were some treasures of songs, including "Lost in Love" which went Top 10 in Australia and somehow found its way to music industry executive Clive Davis in New York.

Clive immediately signed Air Supply to Arista Records and in 1980, "Lost in Love" became the fastest selling single in the world, leaping to the top of all of the charts. Now Air Supply was on their way. The second single was "All Out of Love," and that went up the charts even quicker. Seven top-five singles later, Air Supply at that time had equaled The Beatles' run of consecutive top five singles. The albums Lost in Love, The One That You Love, Now & Forever, and The Greatest Hits sold in excess of 20 million copies. "Lost in Love" was named Song of the Year in 1980, and, with the other singles, sold more than 10 million copies. The trademark sound of Russell Hitchcock's soaring tenor voice and Graham Russell's simple yet majestic songs created a unique sound that would forever be known as Air Supply. However, it is the live shows that always hold audiences captive around the world. They were the first Western group to tour China, Taiwan, and countless other countries that before would not allow pop music across their borders. In 1983 they recorded "Making Love Out Of Nothing At All" by Jim Steinman which solidified the group as a permanent force in modern music. This song was released on The Greatest Hits album which soared past 7 million copies. "Lost in Love", "All Out of Love", "The One That You Love", "Sweet Dreams", and "Making Love Out Of Nothing At All" have each achieved multi-million plays on the radio. In 1986 the group's music was still playing endlessly on radio. That same year, Graham was married to actress Jodi Varble from Rochelle, Illinois, who also was his leading lady in the video for "Making Love Out Of Nothing At All."

Air Supply began to tour with lavish productions in places that no one had been before. In South America and Asia they became a part of everyone's life. In 1988, Air Supply was asked to participate in Australia's bicentennial celebration and to play for HRH Prince Charles and HRH Princess Diana, where they learned both were already ardent fans. This engagement would be one of their most treasured moments in their career. In 1989, they recorded "The Earth Is" album selling over a million copies outside of the U.S. This album was followed by "The Vanishing Race" CD and, with the singles "Goodbye" and "It's Never Too Late", again saw multi-platinum success. The following albums, "News from Nowhere", "Yours Truly", and "Across the Concrete Sky" all gave their second greatest hits album multi-platinum status as they traveled the world each and every year.

In 2000, a new production company was founded to be devoted to Air Supply's entire future product, called A Nice Pear, which gave them complete creative control. In July 2005, their live DVD, "It Was 30 Years Ago Today" celebrated 30 years of success around the world and in that same month, Air Supply smashed attendance records when, in Cuba, at one show they played to 175,000 people. Also 2005 saw the release of "The Singer and the Song", an acoustic album of many of their big hits which received critical acclaim. In May 2010, the long-awaited album, "Mumbo Jumbo" –also the duo's first studio recording in eight years- was released. Recorded at Graham Russell's home studio near Park City, Utah and at Odds On's state of the art facilities in Las Vegas with top session musicians and an orchestra, "Mumbo Jumbo" was produced by Russell and engineered by Odds On's Sean O'Dwyer, whose credits include Pink Floyd, Randy Newman and Blink-182. Among the 14-tracks, released by Odds On's label, was the first single "Dance With Me," which earned Air Supply a prominent feature article in Billboard Magazine titled "Still Supplying The Hits After 35 Years."

Just weeks after composer and vocalist Graham Russell was honored with a BMI Million-Air Certificate recognizing 3 million performances of the duo's hit "All Out Of Love," Air Supply's new song was the #1 most added track on the FMQB AC40 Chart, and also one of the most added on the R&R (Radio and Records) AC Chart and the Mediabase AC chart.

In 2011, the duo continues to play more than 150 shows a year worldwide, including stops in England, Ireland, Israel, Philippines, Korea, Japan, Canada, the U.S. and beyond. Currently, we just finished filming our live Jerusalem, Israel show for a new DVD that will be out later this year. The DVD will feature two new songs, "Sanctuary" and "Everywhere." "Sanctuary" will be released as a single on iTunes by October, 2011.

BILLY CURRINGTON BIO

ENJOY YOURSELF

The title of Billy Currington’s new album, Enjoy Yourself, says it all. “That’s what I want people to think about doing when they hear my music,” the happy-go-lucky Georgia native says. “I want them to have a good time.” And a good time is clearly what they’re having.

He’s garnered an impressive ten Top 10 hits, with six of those hitting No. 1 – “Pretty Good At Drinkin’ Beer,” “That’s How Country Boys Roll,” “People Are Crazy,” ”Don’t,” “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right” and “Good Directions.” He’s sold millions of albums and has been selected to tour with the likes of Kenny Chesney, Brad Paisley and Sugarland. Tour mate Carrie Underwood notes that Billy’s “talent and charm” have made crowds fall in love with him. He also received the compliment of a lifetime from David Letterman, who said about Billy’s “People Are Crazy” performance, “This song will change your life. You’re not going to do any better than this song here.”

His multiple nominations include two 2010 Grammy nominations (Male Country Vocal Performance and Best Country Song) for “People Are Crazy,” which also received nominations for Single and Song of the Year from the Academy of Country Music, as well as Single, Song and Video of the Year from the Country Music Association. He was honored with a 2006 nomination for Top New Male Vocalist at the ACMS, which followed 2005 ACM and CMA nominations for “Party For Two,” his duet with Shania Twain.

He proudly claimed the “Hottest Video of the Year” trophy at the fan-voted 2006 CMT Music Awards for “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right.” Entertainment Weekly has praised his effortless charm, while the Associated Press says, “With Enjoy Yourself, he zeros in on an easy-going soul vibe, a sound that brings out a likeable quality in Currington’s Georgia-raised tenor.”

Despite his laid-back demeanor, Billy has earned a reputation as a hard-working entertainer who puts everything he’s got into his shows every night. He’s taken the stage several times at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena, the very facility that he helped build on his day job while pursuing his musical dreams. He’s still a working man who is drawn to exploring life’s simple truths and pleasures.

“With his rich tenor and relaxed delivery, Billy Currington knows how to put a tear in your beer,” Billboard says. ”Currington sings that he’s ‘not known for doing a lot,’ but he’s certainly found a way to do something that’s undeniably his own.”

Enjoy Yourself, Billy’s fourth album since he burst onto the scene in 2003, builds on the success of his 2008 collection, Little Bit of Everything, which yielded three No. 1 hits: “Don’t,” “People Are Crazy” and “That’s How Country Boys Roll.”

As with Little Bit of Everything, Billy’s latest features his now trademark mix of country, R&B and beach music. “It reflects who I am,” he says. “I’m definitely not just one thing. I’m the beach guy, I’m the country guy, I love my dirt roads and fishin’, but I love New York City and L.A. and Miami, too.”

The album is a perfect storm of material that Billy has been eyeing for just the right moment to release. “Some of these songs date back six to eight years,” he says. “There’s always a right time for everything.”

Finding the right song for the right album is a process in which Billy takes great pride. “I like to live with the songs I’m considering for an album. I like to go to bed at night and wake up in the morning and know I still love a song. If I still love it two years later, maybe other people will too.”

The album’s first single, “Pretty Good At Drinkin’ Beer,” became Billy’s sixth No. 1 hit. Interestingly, he found that song on the same demo CD as “People Are Crazy.” “I knew I should only pick one beer song for my last album so I held on to ‘Pretty Good At Drinkin’ Beer.’ When it came time to record, that was the first one I threw up in the air. Everyone was in agreement that it was a good summertime, first single for an album.”

“Bad Day of Fishin’,” Billy’s songwriting contribution to the record, hilariously advances his theory that a bad day of fishin’ beats a good day of anything else. The equally hilarious “Like My Dog,” includes the lyrics I want you to love me like my dog does. “It’s about a relationship with you and your dog and how you wish your woman would love you just as much and in the same ways,” Billy says with a grin.

But the album is more than songs about dogs and beer. “Until You,” which was written by Dave Barnes, is a love song pure and simple. “It’s got this great melody and simplified smart lyric about you and your girl out under the sky and overlooking the city at night, just enjoying each other’s company.”

The second single, “Let Me Down Easy,” is soulful and sexy, while “All Day Long” is “happy and kind of sexy,” according to Billy. “Nothing too serious.” There’s not a sad song on the set. Even “Love Done Gone,” a Louisiana-infused tune complete with trumpets and trombones, puts a positive spin on a break-up.

“It’s a good vibe album,” Billy explains. “I hope it’s one of those albums that someone can put in when they’re hanging out in their camp spot or they’re grilling out by their pool and just feel good through the whole thing.”

“I know people like sad songs, but they like happy songs more,” Billy believes. “It took me awhile to figure that out. Growing up I was a fan of all of Merle Haggard’s sad stuff and George Strait’s sad stuff—anybody that was singing sad songs. I thought that’s what I wanted to do.”

Turns out, it wasn’t. After feeling the air sucked out of the room when he played heartbreak songs in his otherwise electrifying live shows, Billy decided he’d leave the sad songs to someone else. “I don’t want to feel that way or make anyone else feel that way when they’re listening to my music. I want people to walk away feeling happy.”

“I can’t say I won’t ever record a sad song again, but you’ll mostly hear happy stuff from me from here on,” Billy notes with conviction.

The album features Nashville’s top songwriters, including Troy Jones, Shawn Camp and Mark Nesler.

“This record was about recording songwriters’ songs,” says Billy. “I could have gone back and recorded a bunch of mine that I’ve written, but there were a lot of writers I wanted to record, like Shawn and Troy. I had to put their songs on this album.”

“I always go back to those same writers,” he adds. “They tend to keep writing the good ones.”

The album consists of what Billy has learned so far. “As an artist, I’ve gotten so much better all the way around. In the studio, live, playing the guitar and I’ve strengthened my voice. If you name anything I do musically, it’s gotten better with practice. I still have a lot to learn but I feel that like anything in life, you get better the more you do it.”

“I’m in a good place. I’m in a happy spot,” says Billy, who founded the Global South Relief organization to deliver supplies to those in need in Central American countries. “I’ve learned a lot about myself over the past five years, not only personally, but also as a businessman and an artist.”

Colt Ford Biography

Colt Ford is back with his best album ever and all it took was a return to his roots.

“I went backwards,” Colt says. “I went back to Ride Through The Country.” Which is not to say Colt simply re-hashed his breakthrough album. Quite the contrary, in fact. Declaration of Independence, released on Colt’s own Average Joes Entertainment, will no doubt go down as one of the most noteworthy releases this year, which is saying a lot for a man who has already sold nearly a million albums and 3 million downloads. From planting his patriotic flag on the album’s first track, "Answer to No One, "and closing the album with a prayer on the poetic, honest, and heartfelt "Angels and Demons," which features a conversation with God, the Athens, GA native has covered every human emotion on this record and then some. Longtime collaborator Shannon “Fat Shan” Houchins handles production duties on the album, all-star producer Dann Huff (Keith Urban, Rascal Flatts) also adds his skills to Colt’s groundbreaking effort. In all, Colt wrote or co-wrote 14 of the album’s 15 tracks. “This album is very real and honest and by far the best record I’ve ever made,” Colt says with pride. “The last two records—I stand up and cheer for them—but I tried to make a lot of people happy on the last two records and I took the edge off of it. On this record I put the edge back on there.” The former professional golfer and collaborator with Jermaine Dupri is used to adversity, taking country music by storm at a time when Nashville labels deemed him “not pretty enough” and country radio sees him as too distinct to add to their playlists. The fact is Colt Ford is hard to categorize is exactly why he’s been successful. His fans appreciate his diverse musical talents by the boatloads, as a visit to one of his shows will prove. Colt’s list of guests superstars on Declaration of Independence is an impressive one. Jason Aldean, for whom Colt co-wrote the smash “Dirt Road Anthem,” lends his vocal talents to “Drivin’ Around,” while Jake Owen adds his unique spin on “Back,” the album’s first single. “Jason and I tried to do songs on the last two records and we just hadn’t found the right song,” Colt says of the duet with Jason. “As soon as I heard this one I knew it was the right song. It’s fun. It’s Jason being Jason and me being me.”

And while it’s the lone song on the album Colt didn’t write—it was penned by hit tunesmiths Craig Wiseman, Rodney Clawson and Chris Tompkins—he calls “Drivin’ Around” a “gigantic” tune. Similarly, Colt says he and Jake were just looking for the right song, which they found in “Back”— a very personal song that Colt co-wrote. With a strong hook and powerful verses, the song will make everyone that hears it want to call their mom and dad to talk about growing up. His collaboration with Darius Rucker on “Way Too Early” is another of the album’s highlights. “I’ve known D for a while and he’s got such a distinctive voice. I thought this song suited him very well,” says Colt. “The song says it all: Sometimes late comes way too early. Everyone can relate to that. Sometimes things are over way to soon.”

Meanwhile, Kix Brooks of Brooks & Dunn fame guests on “All In” and label mates Montgomery Gentry add their distinctive gusto to “Ain’t Out Of The Woods.” “That’s as country honky tonk as you can possibly get,” Colt says of the former tune. Those familiar with Colt’s lotta-fun-legacy shouldn’t be surprised that Declaration of Independence is chock-full of good time anthems and left turns. “I hear artists say, ‘I’ve got 10 songs and they’re all singles.’ Well, I don’t know if I want to even hear that record, because that shouldn’t be the case,” Colt contends. “If you did 10 songs and they’re all singles you did a whole album of vanilla. I would prefer to have a few different flavors. Just because something isn’t designed as a single, doesn’t mean it’s not a great song.” While some may see Colt’s duet with Wanya Morris of Boyz II Men on “Happy In Hell” as a strange combination, Colt disagrees. “Great songs are great songs,” he says. “I don’t care who sings them. I just like making the coolest songs I can make. At the end of the day I’m a country artist 100% through and through, but that don’t mean you can’t like other music.” For the legion of fans that have seen Colt’s live shows—over 750,000 did in 2011 alone—“the edge” is what they’ve come to expect. In the same way that a superstar athlete leaves everything he has on the field, Colt knows no other way to perform than to be all in. “I give it everything I’ve got when I go out on stage,” he says. “It’s about the fans. That’s my goal, to reach and touch as many people as I can. I don’t really have any goals beyond that. I’m so blessed and lucky to play music for a living.” That Colt has seen little love from mainstream media and radio only heightens his resolve to get his music in the hands of his fans. “I’m definitely an underdog,” Colt admits. “There ain’t no question about that. Everything about me says I shouldn’t be able to do what I do.” Perhaps it’s that sense of not belonging that allows Colt to connect to his blue-collar fans. “There’s nothing about me that ain’t country,” Colt says with a laugh. As millions of fans and Colt’s artist friends know, truer words have never been spoken.